garlic, bacon and chicken pasta

We’re both feeling quite melancholy as we witnessed something pretty awful today – a bloke having a massive seizure in the middle of IKEA and then screaming and thrashing as he came around. We’re both first-aid trained but when we got there, the staff were doing everything right and were bloody marvellous. What annoyed us more than anything, though, was the table full of old people practically snapping their necks to get a good look at the poor prone man on the floor. Not affording him any dignity or discretion, it was like they were waiting for the last number on their bingo cards. Vultures the bloody lot of them. Hopefully they were found face-down amongst the ANÖOS toys later on. Why are people so shitty?

So it brings me to two things, two pleas, really. And yes, it’s not the usual fun and games and piss-take that we normally bust out, but it’s so important. First – learn basic first aid. Take an hour to watch a few Youtube videos – you’ll find a whole raft of videos by the marvellous St John’s Ambulance right here. No-one is expecting you to give someone a tracheotomy or put in a catheter, but basic first aid makes all the difference. Would you genuinely know what to do if that bloke had been in a room with you and you alone and he had started having a seizure? What if a baby started choking or a kid came to you with a broken arm? We’re lucky – we’ve both been trained because of our jobs – but it’s such a frightening position to be in that I’d hate to have to do it without the facts. If you’re in employment, why not ask your HR if they’ll get you on a training course? You just don’t know when you’ll need it. As a moment of sweet relief, here’s a post about the last time James went for first aid training.

Second short plea? Get yourself on the organ donation register. If you’ve got strong, sensible views against it then all the best to you and we’ll say no more – it’s personal choice. But if you’re not on it as an oversight or because you haven’t got round to doing it, here, sign up now. It’s odd – the issue has come to our attention via the same disease – cystic fibrosis, with a friend of mine losing a good friend to it and one of our lovely lasses in our group posting on behalf of her friend who is slowly losing her lungs. I’d love to think that when I die, they take whatever they need from me. My eyes are fucked, so there’s no point there. Heart is probably shot and doesn’t beat so well, and lungs have been blackened by years of parents who thought nicotine was a suitable replacement for fresh air (I kid. Sometimes they used to wind the window down in the car). My skin is good, though, so graft away, and my brain – assuming it’s not being turned to sponge by some dastardly CJD prions (I ate a lot of cheap beef back in the day), is fairly sharp. They could take my balls if they wanted, they’re in decent shape, and hell if you want my willy, it’s there, though years of growing up alone in the country with nothing to do means it’s like a well-worn tyre now. I jest I jest. Trying to inject some levity. Go on. Sign up on the register. I promise you that if I die before you, and given my calorie intake and sloth levels of exercise, it’ll probably happen, you can take what you want.

OK. So let’s do the recipe.

chicken and bacon pasta

 

to make the garlic, bacon and chicken pasta, you’ll need:

  • 400g pasta of your choice
  • 1 red onion, finely chopped
  • 4 bacon medallions
  • 2 chicken breasts
  • 6 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • 50oml passata
  • ½ tsp paprika

 

to make the garlic, bacon and chicken pasta, you should:

  • cook the pasta according to the instructions – drain and rinse with cold water and set aside (this is a trick I learnt recently – works a treat!)
  • in a large frying pan heat some oil over a medium-high heat, add the onions and cook until softened, stirring frequently
  • meanwhile, chop the bacon and chicken into small pieces and add to the pan, reduce the heat slightly and cook until they meat is browned all over
  • add the paprika and garlic to the pan and cook for about thirty seconds, stirring constantly
  • add the passata to the pan, stir and cook for about fifteen minutes until the mixture has thickened
  • add the pasta back to the pan, stir through and heat for about three minutes
  • serve!

Comments

comments

28 thoughts on “garlic, bacon and chicken pasta

  1. Thanks for posting a link to the organ donor register and talking about donation on your wonderful blog. Some people don’t register because they believe their organs aren’t transplantable. It’s all a myth. Corneas can be transplanted from most people under the age of 95 ……!

  2. I just made it, it was lovely, but I found (as I often do) that the passata was a little bitter. I’m going to trying adding a touch of diet lemonade to sweeten it slightly next time. Fabulous & syn-free. Thanks 🙂

  3. This was delicious, myself and the kids really enjoyed it and i had the leftovers the next day with salad. I did add a teaspoon of sugar because the kids were having it and bought decent brand of passata. Now to look which recipe to try next. Thank you.

  4. Thanks for this and for reminding us of the importance of organ donation. I have registered to be one but 20 odd years ago as my last child had just been born l was asked to fill one in for her….l would have donated any organ needed but said ‘no’ to the corneas. I couldn’t bear the thought. Now that baby is a wonderful young woman training to be a nurse. I told her about the organ donation thing and she said to me, “oh mum, what a thing to be able to give someone….the gift of sight. You should have said yes to the corneas too”. Wish we all thought like that…

  5. Wow….delicious! I halved the ingredients to make 2 servings and I can have the other serving tomorrow 🙂 I also added chopped mushrooms.

      • Unless you count the calories yourself I doubt anyone can really help you. It depends exactly how much of everything you use and what brands. In slimming world you don’t count calories which is probably why he hasn’t included any.

  6. I know I’m late to the party on this one but thanks for raising the subject of organ donation. To add to that I would like to mention that my lovely mum, who passed away in 2014 at the age of 91, donated her whole body to medical research. She was accepted as a donor and is currently in residence at Liverpool University! We are so very proud of her and most of the adults in our family have been inspired to do the same. Not everyone is aware that this is an option.

    Thanks for the fabulous recipes and the laughs along the way. I sat for 5 solid hours last night going through your posts and I’m now on duty again this morning! xx

    • I’m a heart failure ‘victim’ and I’ve donated my body. Just a bit unsure of what they do when they’ve finished with me. Will I be returned to my family or do they cremate me themselves? Cx

      • I believe that when they are finished, you are returned to your family and they are responsible for buriel or cremation, but I could be wrong!

        Thank you also for raising awareness of donors because of a fantastic donor’s family I was given a better life after a kidney transplant 18 months ago. Its a debt I can only repay with being a donor myself!

        I will be making this dish later for tea, I have made loads of your dishes and think they are amazing!!!

    • There’s none in this recipe, but this part should only take up a third of your plate – the ‘speed’ third can be whatever you choose to have with it. We had a simple spinach and rocket salad 🙂

  7. can i ask a daft question , being blonde and all lol can you freeze this, if not is it ok to be eaten cold the day after? keep up the good work guys love your blogs and great food ideas have lost more weight with these than slimming world!!! 🙂 🙂

  8. I joined two weeks ago but am struggling, know it is easy but confused. I don’t care for veg so try making soup instead. Breakfast, lunch ok but dinner ?? Not a meat eater either so where do I go from here ? Any help appreciated.
    Love your site, just reading through it right now.

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